RhandaLand

“For children, childhood is timeless. It is always the present. Everything is in the present tense. Of course, they have memories. Of course, time shifts a little for them and Christmas comes round in the end. But they don’t feel it. Today is what they feel, and when they say ‘When I grow up,’ there is always an edge of disbelief—how could they ever be other than what they are?”
Ian McEwan

(via ratak-monodosico & tryingtofollow) (via arsvitaest) (via an-itinerant-poet) (via chutesdimages) (via hairybottle) (via unconditionedconsciousness) (via hot-tea-and-day-dreams) (via peacechildd) (via thepoetoaster) (via lifeinpoetry)
artpixie:

Let’s eat fruit! (by stefania manzi)

artpixie:

Let’s eat fruit! (by stefania manzi)

Glad I Broke

dearoldlove:

I’m glad I broke myself on you. It gave me some edge and the ability relate to other broken people, which are most people.

“The long silences need to be loved, perhaps
more than the words
which arrive
to describe them
in time.”
— Franz Wright, from section II of “East Boston, 1996”, in God’s Silence, with thanks to apoetreflects (via growing-orbits)

(via lifeinpoetry)

wildcat2030:

Carrying a posy of bright flowers, Dorthe Frydenlund strolls through a Roskilde graveyard to honour her father Bent, who died earlier this year. Mrs Frydenlund is among those pioneering a novel way to commemorate the deceased. Nestling amongst the colourful plants and vases is a stone with a chip called a QR (Quick Response) Code. Mrs Frydenlund’s 14-year-old son Nikolai has a smartphone equipped with a free code-reading programme downloaded from the internet for free. Continue reading the main story “Start Quote Code mounted on stone It’s a good way to tell the story of a person and we all have a story” Niels Kristian Nielsen Nikolai reaches down, scans the QR Code with his phone and instantly the screen fills with a photograph of his grandfather, along with a summary of his life. “As a family it means a lot when you are here and feel the need to commemorate Dad,” says Mrs Frydenlund. “It’s not meant as a comfort, more an opportunity for other people to learn his life story. It’s a good way for my son to remember his grandfather.” The QR codes, which cost about 100 euros (£78; $123), are capable of storing audio and video and can help keep the deceased’s legacy alive in a creative way. (via BBC News - Denmark pioneers hi-tech graveyard memorials with QR code)

wildcat2030:

Carrying a posy of bright flowers, Dorthe Frydenlund strolls through a Roskilde graveyard to honour her father Bent, who died earlier this year. Mrs Frydenlund is among those pioneering a novel way to commemorate the deceased. Nestling amongst the colourful plants and vases is a stone with a chip called a QR (Quick Response) Code. Mrs Frydenlund’s 14-year-old son Nikolai has a smartphone equipped with a free code-reading programme downloaded from the internet for free. Continue reading the main story “Start Quote Code mounted on stone It’s a good way to tell the story of a person and we all have a story” Niels Kristian Nielsen Nikolai reaches down, scans the QR Code with his phone and instantly the screen fills with a photograph of his grandfather, along with a summary of his life. “As a family it means a lot when you are here and feel the need to commemorate Dad,” says Mrs Frydenlund. “It’s not meant as a comfort, more an opportunity for other people to learn his life story. It’s a good way for my son to remember his grandfather.” The QR codes, which cost about 100 euros (£78; $123), are capable of storing audio and video and can help keep the deceased’s legacy alive in a creative way. (via BBC News - Denmark pioneers hi-tech graveyard memorials with QR code)